A Team Based on Trust and Communication

Why Choose Beckerman Anderson To Handle Your Case?

Even the most seasoned lawyer does not represent themselves in court. And while not every legal issue requires one, you may not wish to risk foregoing your right for your case to be heard and your opportunity for legal protection. In the midst of a divorce or recovery from a serious injury; securing legal representation may be the last thing you have energy to consider. However, allowing us to focus on the complex legal issues will give you the time and focus to prepare for your life after the case is successfully completed. Our goal is not only to develop the best and most cost-efficient strategy for achieving a positive result, but also to inform and educate our clients about the law along the way. We have found that by providing our clients with a better understanding of the legal issues involved, they are more able to actively participate in their matter.

Our Successes

$1,000,000

We received a $1,000,000 settlement including benefits from a third party claim, underinsured motorist claim, and workers’ compensation claim for a client injured in a head-on collision with a truck.

$730,000

We received a $730,000 settlement in the wrongful death of a 20 year old who jumped on a moving car at a house party. The settlement includes compensation from the driver of the car and the owner of the house.

$400,000

We received a $400,000 jury verdict awarded for the wrongful death of a mentally disabled adult when his caretakers failed to properly supervise him during lunch.

$175,000

We received a $175,000 settlement for a woman who broke her ankle after falling down the stairs outside her apartment.

$155,000

We received a $155,000 settlement in a disputed liability auto accident where the client sustained a broken ankle.

View More Success Stories

Personal Injury

Personal Injury

With our experience protecting the rights of individuals harmed by the negligence and misconduct of others, Beckerman Anderson, APC, a Costa Mesa Personal Injury law firm, will zealously represent you if you have been injured. Our partners have collected millions of dollars for injured victims. If you’ve been injured and need the help of an accident attorney to make sure you get the compensation you deserve, call (877) LAW-3434.

Do You Have a Personal Injury Case We Can Help With?

Auto Accidents
Motorcycle Accidents
Large Truck Accidents
Uninsured Motorist
Pedestrian Accidents
Slip and Fall Accidents
Bicycle Accidents
Wrongful Death

Civil Litigation

If you are involved in a civil dispute, Beckerman Anderson, APC can help. Civil litigation can arise over any number of issues. These are any cases between individuals with a dispute over money or property. Some of the more common disputes are breach of contract, misrepresentation, and personal injury, but whatever the matter is, Beckerman Anderson, APC is there for you.

Litigation involves many technical procedures and deadlines which we are trained to handle. We have all seen the trials on television, but what those programs leave out is the months of preparation leading up to the trial. If you are involved in a dispute with another person, contact us today for a free consultation. We can help you develop a strategy and plan of attack to lead to a successful result.

When running a business, all sorts of disputes can arise. Invoices do not get paid. Contractors do not perform the services the way they that they should. Unfortunately, it is just the nature of doing business. The attorneys at Beckerman Anderson, APC are experienced in handling disputes of all sorts and can develop a strategy to deal with your particular circumstances. Whether it is an informal negotiation, an arbitration, or full-scale litigation, Beckerman Anderson, APC can chart a course based on all the circumstances to get you to the best resolution.
The business world runs on contracts. A contract is nothing more than an agreement between two parties about something that will take place. Although there are rules regarding what needs to be included in various types of agreements, generally speaking, a contract can be anything from a simple oral promise to a complex multi-page written document. Regardless of the form the contract takes, when one party does not do what they are supposed to do under the agreement, it can have devastating consequences for the other party. This is called a “breach of contract” and may give rise to a claim for damages for any of those negative consequences. If you believe that someone broke a contract with you or if someone else is accusing you of breaking their contract, then Beckerman Anderson, APC can analyze your situation and advise you on the best strategy to get the matter resolved.
Within a business, occasionally the people in charge of the business disagree about how the business should be running or the direction the business is heading. Most of the time, the disagreement will work itself out, but sometimes it will not. When it doesn’t, it can have a devastating effect on the business’ bottom line. In these situations, it is important to have an experienced attorney like those at Beckerman Anderson, APC who can advise you about each person’s rights and obligations to the business and to each other and let you know if one person has overstepped the bounds of what is permissible.
We all have insurance to protect us from the unexpected and we expect that our insurance company is going to be there for us when it happens. Unfortunately, however, that is not always the case. The insurance companies are businesses and they often look after their own bottom line at the expense of their customers. An insurance contract is a complicated document which imposes all kinds of conditions in order for a person to make a claim. The insurance companies will be looking for any excuse to deny a claim, so if a claim is not presented in the right way or the claimant says the wrong thing, the claim might get denied. A life insurance company might refuse to pay benefits after a loved one has passed away, a homeowner’s policy might choose to not help with a damaged home or a liability carrier might refuse to defend a person that is getting sued. If you think you have a claim, it is usually best to contact Beckerman Anderson, APC prior to contacting the insurance company in order to make sure everything is properly presented and the claim gets accepted. However, even if you do not contact Beckerman Anderson, APC beforehand and your claim gets denied, all is not lost. Our attorneys can carefully review the facts and circumstances surrounding the denial and do what is necessary to get the insurance company to change its decision, even if that means taking the insurance company to court.

Civil Litigation

Business Law

Business Law

Small businesses are the lifeblood of the economy. At Beckerman Anderson APC we understand that it is tough enough to run a successful business without having to worry about legal technicalities. Whether you want a contract reviewed or a corporation formed, Beckerman Anderson APC can help. We can counsel you not only with your current business needs, but also show you effective measures to implement in the future. We can help your business to meet legal requirements.

Contracts and agreements are unavoidable in business. It is vital that companies have someone on their side to negotiate and draft the important contracts that may control their business for years to come. Be sure that the contracts your company is signing accurately reflect the terms you are agreeing to. Don’t rely on the other side’s attorney to draft the contract. Come to the table with the attorneys at Beckerman Anderson APC by your side. Our attorneys can help with negotiations and drafting of your important contracts, or even just review your existing contracts and help you understand your rights and obligations. Not only does Beckerman Anderson APC help draft contracts, but our litigation attorneys are prepared to represent your interests in any contract disputes.

Choosing the right form of business is the most important decision to make when starting a new business. There are many different forms of business with pros and cons to each. The attorneys at Beckerman Anderson APC can help you choose the right form of business for your situation. Many people are familiar with the general “C” Corporation, but that does not always work for companies that aren’t on the Fortune 500 list. An LLC (Limited Liability Company), LLP (Limited Liability Partnership), S Corporation, General Partnership, Limited Partnership, Joint Venture, or Sole Proprietorship may be more appropriate for your situation. Choosing the wrong form of business could cost you thousands of dollars.The attorneys at Beckerman Anderson APC can explain the differences of these types of businesses and provide you with the information you need to make the right decision for your situation.

While the popular, online one-size-fits-all approach to business formation may work for some people, it does not fit everyone’s particular situation. Businesses are different and the people who own and operate them are different. Making sure you choose the right form of business is a priority at Beckerman Anderson APC. With our law firm, an attorney is working with you every step of the way. There is no algorithm or paralegal drafting your formation documents. Before you form your business, talk to the attorneys at Beckerman Anderson APC and see if our approach works for you.

In the general course of business, a company is likely to find itself facing a lawsuit or needing to enforce their rights in court at some time. When that happens, don’t go at it alone. The other side will probably have an attorney representing their interests, you should too. The attorneys at Beckerman Anderson APC are experienced in litigating business disputes and will stand with your company every step of the way. You can be assured that Beckerman Anderson APC will have your back and fight to protect your rights. Beckerman Anderson APC represents clients in contract disputes, unfair competition claims, partnership dissolutions, shareholder disputes, and many other legal issues a business might face. Before you do or say something that might hurt your case, talk to the attorneys at Beckerman Anderson APC and see if our representation can help you.

Estate Planning

Estate Planning is the process of protecting yourself and your family during your lifetime and after you have passed away. Nobody wants to think about his or her own death or disability, but taking the time to develop a comprehensive plan will spare your loved ones from unnecessary expenses, arguments, and frustrations later. Once our clients commit to putting a plan in place, they find that thinking about what they will be giving to loved ones is a rewarding experience.

At Beckerman Anderson, APC, we do not use a one-size-fits-all approach. We take the time to look at and consider all of your assets, finances, family situation, health, and most importantly, goals. We will then work with you to develop a comprehensive plan to effectuate those goals in the most efficient and cost-conscious manner.

Probate refers to the court-supervised process by which a deceased person’s assets are distributed to his or her creditors and whoever else is entitled to receive it. It is a matter of public record. If a person dies with a will, then the terms of the will direct who is to receive the property. If a person dies without a will, then the property will pass by the state’s default rules called intestate succession. Probate can be a long and expensive process because it is supervised by the court and requires court approval for most significant actions, but there are streamlined procedures now though which can cut down considerably on the time and expense. Most people want to try to avoid probate as much as possible, but for some people, depending on their circumstances, it may be a better option. At Beckerman Anderson, APC, we will consider your specific circumstances and allow you to decide what makes the most sense for you.

The general rule is that in order for property to pass to another it must go through probate unless it is being passed by a non-probate method. Although a trust is perhaps the most commonly known method to avoid probate, there are numerous other methods that can be implemented to avoid probate as well. At Beckerman Anderson, APC, we will consider all of the methods in light of our client’s goals. We find it important when doing estate planning not just to consider who is to receive the property but to look at each asset individually and have a plan in place to transfer it.

Essentially, a living trust is a new entity that is created for the purpose of holding your assets. You will transfer your assets to the trust and they become the trust property. You will also appoint a trustee to manage the property and to distribute it to the beneficiaries according to your wishes. When you create a revocable living trust, you will start off as the trustee and beneficiary and essentially manage the property the same as if the trust was never created. The benefit comes when you pass away or when you are no longer capable of managing your own affairs. In the trust document, you will name a successor trustee who can step in to manage the trust property when you are not able. If you are alive, the successor trustee will manage the property for your benefit without needing to obtain court approval via conservatorship. After you pass away, the successor trustee will then distribute the property to your beneficiaries according to your wishes, whether that is an immediate outright distribution or whether you want the trustee to continue to hold the property in trust until your beneficiaries are more capable of managing their own affairs. Again, no court approval will be needed for any asset that is within the trust. 

There are a number of other methods that can be used to pass assets upon your death without them having to go through probate. Some of the most common are:

  • Joint Tenancy/Right of Survivorship – If the property is held by two or more people with the right of survivorship, then immediately upon the death of one of the owners, the property becomes vested in the survivor by operation of law. This can be a very efficient way to transfer property. However, a joint tenant is a co-owner of the property which may not be desirable. It also could create an issue if you want your estate to be split among multiple parties.
  • Time-of-Death Designation – Many forms of financial accounts allow you to name a person who will succeed to the account upon your death. This can be a very effective means of transferring a bank account, but again, depending on the number of beneficiaries to your estate, it could create issues.
  • Life Insurance Beneficiary – The proceeds payable under a life insurance policy will be paid to the named beneficiary in the policy document and, so long as the beneficiary isn’t the decedent’s estate, will not become the property of the estate.
  • Gifts – Although gifting would be something that occurs during life, for some people starting to transfer the assets prior to death is preferable and an effective means of avoiding probate. However, before starting to give away your estate, you must be aware that there are yearly and lifetime caps on how much you can give before taxes will be assessed.
If you are no longer able to manage your own affairs, someone will need to step in to do so. If you have a revocable trust in place, the successor trustee will be able to step in and manage the assets of the trust without court supervision.
However, if you have assets that are not within the trust, the successor trustee will not have the authority to manage those assets. In order to avoid this problem, you can execute a “springing” financial power of attorney which grants another person the authority to act as your agent and manage your financial affairs if you become incapacitated. (If you have capacity, you could also execute power of attorney which immediately grants someone else the authority to act on your behalf). Without a power of attorney, assets not held in the revocable trust would be subject to a court-supervised conservatorship, which is an expensive and burdensome process.

Probate refers to the court-supervised process by which a deceased person’s assets are distributed to his or her creditors and whoever else is entitled to receive it. It is a matter of public record. If a person dies with a will, then the terms of the will direct who is to receive the property. If a person dies without a will, then the property will pass by the state’s default rules called intestate succession. Probate can be a long and expensive process because it is supervised by the court and requires court approval for most significant actions, but there are streamlined procedures now though which can cut down considerably on the time and expense. Most people want to try to avoid probate as much as possible, but for some people, depending on their circumstances, it may be a better option. At Beckerman Anderson, APC, we will consider your specific circumstances and allow you to decide what makes the most sense for you.

The general rule is that in order for property to pass to another it must go through probate unless it is being passed by a non-probate method. Although a trust is perhaps the most commonly known method to avoid probate, there are numerous other methods that can be implemented to avoid probate as well. At Beckerman Anderson, APC, we will consider all of the methods in light of our client’s goals. We find it important when doing estate planning not just to consider who is to receive the property but to look at each asset individually and have a plan in place to transfer it.

Essentially, a living trust is a new entity that is created for the purpose of holding your assets. You will transfer your assets to the trust and they become the trust property. You will also appoint a trustee to manage the property and to distribute it to the beneficiaries according to your wishes. When you create a revocable living trust, you will start off as the trustee and beneficiary and essentially manage the property the same as if the trust was never created. The benefit comes when you pass away or when you are no longer capable of managing your own affairs. In the trust document, you will name a successor trustee who can step in to manage the trust property when you are not able. If you are alive, the successor trustee will manage the property for your benefit without needing to obtain court approval via conservatorship. After you pass away, the successor trustee will then distribute the property to your beneficiaries according to your wishes, whether that is an immediate outright distribution or whether you want the trustee to continue to hold the property in trust until your beneficiaries are more capable of managing their own affairs. Again, no court approval will be needed for any asset that is within the trust. 

There are a number of other methods that can be used to pass assets upon your death without them having to go through probate. Some of the most common are:

  • Joint Tenancy/Right of Survivorship – If the property is held by two or more people with the right of survivorship, then immediately upon the death of one of the owners, the property becomes vested in the survivor by operation of law. This can be a very efficient way to transfer property. However, a joint tenant is a co-owner of the property which may not be desirable. It also could create an issue if you want your estate to be split among multiple parties.
  • Time-of-Death Designation – Many forms of financial accounts allow you to name a person who will succeed to the account upon your death. This can be a very effective means of transferring a bank account, but again, depending on the number of beneficiaries to your estate, it could create issues.
  • Life Insurance Beneficiary – The proceeds payable under a life insurance policy will be paid to the named beneficiary in the policy document and, so long as the beneficiary isn’t the decedent’s estate, will not become the property of the estate.
  • Gifts – Although gifting would be something that occurs during life, for some people starting to transfer the assets prior to death is preferable and an effective means of avoiding probate. However, before starting to give away your estate, you must be aware that there are yearly and lifetime caps on how much you can give before taxes will be assessed.
In the event a person becomes unable to make medical decisions for himself or herself, a Health Care Directive serves two functions: First, it designates an agent who will be authorized to make medical decisions on behalf of the incapacitated person. Second, it provides guidance to the agent as to the incapacitated person’s preferences regarding his or her health care.

Estate Planning

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